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Age of Empires: The Rise of Rome

Publishers Microsoft
Developers Ensemble Studios
Release date 1998
Genre Strategy
Game rating

Game Description

Age of Empires: The Rise of Rome is a real-time strategy game developed by Ensemble Studios and released by Microsoft on October 31, 1998. It is an official expansion pack of the Age of Empires, the first Age of Empires game to be released. Age of Empires: The Rise of Rome includes four new campaigns and civilizations inspired by Ancient Rome as well as new technologies and units. The Rise of Rome, at the time of its release, became the most profitable game ever published by Microsoft selling over a million copies.

New additions to the game

The Rise of Rome includes four unreleased campaigns, retracing the history of the Roman Empire from its foundation to its fall. The player is led to relive the conquest of Gaul in England, the clashes between Caesar and Pompey, the wars between Augustus and Marc-Antony, and the Carthaginian wars/invasion of the Huns. Four new civilizations inspired by Ancient Rome also make their first appearance: the Roman Empire, the Kingdom of Macedonia and the cities of Carthage and Palmyra. It also introduces new technologies, buildings and units such as war elephants and camels.

Download Age of Empires: The Rise of Rome

Age of Empires: The Rise of Rome is no longer abandonware. You can now buy the game from:

Windows (1998)

Age of Empires: Definitive Edition on Steam

Additional files, patches and fixes

Age of Empires: The Rise of Rome Windows Manual (English)

Age of Empires: The Rise of Rome Screenshots

Windows

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  1. This game is no longer supported, for AOE I DE you should buy AOE II DE and the AOE I DE DLC; but don’t hold your breath, because this will probably change in a year when they ask for another 30 dollars for the AOE DE collection.

    I’m going to tally up my AoE purchases here. AOE DE on from the MIcrosoft store (which didn’t work at all), AOE DE on Steam (which kind of works), AOE II on steam, and AOE II DE. I purchased AOE III (non DE) but refunded it because it was too buggy to play.

    If you purchased this game then you were misled and played by Microsoft, and you should be upset. This game is a buggy mess. Campaign maps that stall and prevent the player from finishing the campaign indefinitely. Miserably poor pathing that gets units stuck all over the place. Units will bug out and cease attacking until they die or the match ends. It’s a pile of poo.

    With all of these frequent issues that can easily be replicated, this game has been abandoned. Alright, pretty frustrating, but not the end of the world, right? Well, this game is now being resold as a DLC for Age of Empires II DE with full support and planned content updates.

    In other words, this game should be completely removed from existence, but here it sits in a buggy mess for suckers to get conned into buying because Microshaft is objectively greedy. This was a deliberate maneuver to confuse consumers, or a massive blunder that should leave even die hard fans cursing this studio.

    We should have seen AOE DE – pulled from the store. AOE II DE replaced by a title like “AOE collection”, because in it’s current state AOE II DE is two different games. AOE DE, as it exists independently of AOE II DE, should then be compensated to anyone who owns the currently abandoned AOE DE. Problem solved. If you ask me, they shot themselves in the foot with this one. There is no way I spend another dime on AOE. I know there are die hard fans that will continue to buy DLC for these games anyways, but this studio is milking their consumers by selling content they plan to abandon.

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